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Best way to learn Syriac for cheap or free?
#31
Steve,

As you should know, a scribal mistake, isn't a purposeful alteration of the Text, or a willful addition to the original text, it is a simple mistake of the eyes and hand. This does not render the Manuscript another version or another textual version...it is a real Aramaic New Testament just the same, and can be checked against the rest of the Peshitta Manuscripts of the same textual tradition.

I don't know why you have such a hard time understanding these things.

No, I'm not Scottish, Steve. Nor am I playing games here, this is about what is true, and what isn't true. It's not about me or about you at all.

It seems then, that you aren't aware of the differences, both small and large, in The Peshitta's text with that of its revisions. As you might know, the UBS/BFBS text, which you use in your Apparatus there, is NOT The Peshitta Text, or from any one Manuscript, it is a patchwork text of various Aramaic manuscripts, which utilize the later Western revisions for its then (early 1900's) newly constructed text, and has the added W5 books as well, which even it indicates in the notes that they are no part of The Peshitta Text.
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#32
Thirdwoe Wrote:As you should know, a scribal mistake, isn't a purposeful alteration of the Text, or a willful addition to the original text, it is a simple mistake of the eyes and hand. This does not render the Manuscript another version or another textual version...it is a real Aramaic New Testament just the same, and can be checked against the rest of the Peshitta Manuscripts of the same textual tradition.

Outside of the handful of verses muddled with due to theological issues, and the 5 "pious writings," how do you determine if amar na or amarna is "correct"? What is your methodology? Your criteria?

You do realize this sort of thing has been hashed about by genuine scholars already? Folks who can actually read the language and have backgrounds in Biblical Studies? <!-- sSmile --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/smile.gif" alt="Smile" title="Smile" /><!-- sSmile -->

Thirdwoe Wrote:No, I'm not Scottish, Steve.

In case you're simply being obtuse again: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_true_Scotsman

Don't get your kilt in a knot. <!-- sSmile --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/smile.gif" alt="Smile" title="Smile" /><!-- sSmile -->

Peace,
-Steve
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#33
Steve,

I don't don a kilt either, thank God. <!-- sSmile --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/smile.gif" alt="Smile" title="Smile" /><!-- sSmile -->

There are a number of variants in the Western revisions and versions, put there by the SO and others, which show their copies being brought more in line with the Greek text, Acts 8:37 comes to mind at present.

This work of revision was purposeful, and in some cases, whole versions were newly translated from a Greek source text into Aramaic. All these more modern revisions and versions of the original Aramaic NT text are not what is rightly called The Peshitta.

There are also many differences in the spelling of names and places based on the dialect of the region where these revisions and versions were made.

We know that the Assyrian Christians of The Church of the East have not been subjected to Western and Greek influences when it comes to their manuscript copies of The Aramaic New Testament, and have kept their Aramaic New Testament free from these later alterations.

They didn't change their original beliefs, and they didn't change their original New Testament text during the Western controversies over the two natures of Christ. The SO and other Western church groups did so, and you can see where they brought the text more in line with the Greek text in use in their lands. Their versions are hybrids.


.
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#34
I might try this approach working with Younan's interlinear.
I could cover over words while going along, lift the paper for words I don't know, and make a dictionary listing some of the new words & definitions I encounter.

Reading through the Greek New Testament
by Daniel B. Wallace
<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://danielbwallace.com/2013/12/29/reading-through-the-greek-new-testament/">http://danielbwallace.com/2013/12/29/re ... testament/</a><!-- m -->
The best way to read through the NT so as to increase your reading proficiency is to translate each chapter three times. As a rule of thumb, you should translate no less than one whole chapter and no more than about ten chapters at a time?.
Every time you translate, employ the ?revolving door? principle. That is, rotate some chapters in and rotate some out. Thus, for example, if you try to translate through the NT in one year, you could translate one new chapter a day, but a total of three chapters a day. ?. For example:
Day 1: Matthew 1.
Day 2: Matthew 1?2.
Day 3: Matt 1?3.
Day 4: Matt 2?4.
Day 5: Matt 3?5, etc.
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