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"Master YHWH" and "I AM"s in the Peshitta
#72
a) Mark 10:46-52: gloss
b) Mt 6:11 and Lk 11:3: made-up word

Gloss added, botched transliteration and translation: Mark 10:46-52

Mark 10:46-52 (HCSB)
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46 They came to Jericho. And as He was leaving Jericho with His disciples and a large crowd, Bartimaeus (the son of Timaeus), a blind beggar, was sitting by the road. 47 When he heard that it was Jesus the Nazarene, he began to cry out, "Son of David, Jesus, have mercy on me!" 48 Many people told him to keep quiet, but he was crying out all the more, "Have mercy on me, Son of David!"
49 Jesus stopped and said, "Call him."
So they called the blind man and said to him, "Have courage! Get up; He's calling for you." 50 He threw off his coat, jumped up, and came to Jesus.
51 Then Jesus answered him, "What do you want Me to do for you?"
"Rabbouni,"[a: Hb for _my teacher_] the blind man told Him, "I want to see!"
52 "Go your way," Jesus told him. "Your faith has healed you." Immediately he could see and began to follow Him on the road.

There's a gloss in Greek mss. in v. 46 with "Bartimaeus (the son of Timaeus)." "Bar-" is Aramaic for "son," and "bar-Timaeus" means "son of Timaeus." Greek mss. also left out a "Timi," since the original Aramaic reads "Timi bar-Timi [Timi son of Timi i.e. Timi, Jr.]."

There's a botched transliteration in v. 51 with "Rabbouni." The original Aramaic is here better transliterated as "Rabbi-- there's no "n." Perhaps the Greek translator or Greek manuscript copyist was mistakenly thinking of John 20:16, where there is again the transliteration "Rabbouni" in Greek manuscripts (though even in John 20:16, the original Aramaic there is better transliterated "Rabbuli"-- with an "l" instead of an "n").

Greek mss. incorrectly have Jesus' first words to the beggar's request for healing be a brusque, "Go your way."
In contrast, the original Aramaic has Jesus' first words to the man's request be the kinder, "See."

There's a botched translation in verses 51-52, by having Jesus tell the beggar,
"Go your way," after which the healed man "began to follow Him on the road."
In contrast, the original Aramaic much more sensibly has Jesus telling the man,
"See," after which "he saw, and went off down the road."

Translating from the original Aramaic:

Mark 10:46-52 (based on Younan)
46. And they came to Yerikho. And when Yeshua and his talmida [students] and a great crowd went out from Yerikho, a blind man, Timi bar-Timi [Timi son of Timi i.e. Timi, Jr.], was sitting on the side of the road and begging. 47. And he heard that it was Yeshua the Nasraya, and he began to cry out and to say, "Bareh-d'Dawid [of Dawid his son, i.e. Son of David], have mercy on me!" 48. Many were reproving him to be silent, but he was crying out all the more and saying, "Bareh-d'Dawid, have mercy on me!" 49. And Yeshua stopped and commanded that they call him. And they called the blind man and said to him, "Have courage! Arise, he calls you." 50. And the blind man threw off his clothes, arose, and came toward Yeshua. 51. Yeshua said to him,
"What is it (that) you desire me to do for you?"
And the blind man said to him, "Rabbi, that I may see!" 52. And Yeshua said to him,
"See.
Your faith has made you whole."
And immediately he saw, and went off down the road.

=====================================
Made-up word: Mt 6:11 and Lk 11:3

Greek mss. have a made-up word in Mt 6:11 and Lk 11:3, "epiousion," often guessed to mean "daily":

Matthew 6:11 (NABRE)
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[a]Give us today our daily bread;
a: Give us today our daily bread: the rare Greek word _epiousios_, here daily, occurs in the New Testament only here and in Lk 11:3. A single occurrence of the word outside of these texts and of literature dependent on them has been claimed, but the claim is highly doubtful. The word may mean daily or "future" (other meanings have also been proposed).

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This word occurs nowhere else in Greek literature except in the context of the Lord's prayer. Guesses include, necessary for today, necessary for tomorrow, daily, sufficient, Mt. 6:11; Lk. 11:3

In contrast, the original Aramaic of the Peshitta for Mt 6:11 and Lk 11:3 consists of words also found elsewhere in the Peshitta.

Incidentally, Mt 6:11 uses "yomna"-- this day, daily-- while Lk 11:3 instead uses "klium"-- every day, daily. Also, to mean "as," Mt 6:10 uses "aikna" while Lk 11:2 uses "aik." Hence, in at least 2 places, the Luke version means the same, but has less-perfect rhyming compared with the Matthew version. In my opinion, Yeshua-- God incarnate-- gave a model prayer with superb rhyming recorded in Mt 6. The Lk 11 rendition means the same, but has less rhyming and fewer of Yeshua's original words, besides lacking "for of yours is the Kingdom, and the power, and the glory, l'ailm-ailmin [to age-ages; or: to world-worlds]."
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Re: "Master YHWH" and "I AM"s in the Peshitta - by DavidFord - 05-23-2015, 12:42 PM

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