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Well I managed to get the Mosul Bible now [Arabic Peshitta] and thought I would share it with you. An intriguing area is that of the usage of the Arabic translit. FARAQLEYT rather than the Arabic NIV's usage of MU'AYN which is based on the English interpretation of the Paraclete as meaning Counselor or Comforter. Interesting to see this translit into Arabic [there is no P in arabic so F is used instead].

Yet I was disappointed to see, yet again, the usage of AL REB for YAHWEH. AL REB in Arabic means 'the master' or 'the lord' and is again based on this flawed understanding of YAHWEH for some reason meaning 'lord'. Hebrew also has the word REB for master, and it is used for Jewish priests today, so it is a shame to use this translation for the word.

Nevertheless, I expect this to be an accurate rendition of the Aramaic Peshitta into Arabic and to further help our understanding of scrpture. The Gospels [Ingeel] are called Sefer Maty, Sefer Marqos, Sefer Luqa and Sefer Yuhana.

Paul, do you understand Paracleyta thus to mean 'end of the curse' rather than the usual comforter interpretation. I would think your understanding is accurate on this. I never bought the comforter interpretation literally
Gentile Wrote:Yet I was disappointed to see, yet again, the usage of AL REB for YAHWEH. AL REB in Arabic means 'the master' or 'the lord' and is again based on this flawed understanding of YAHWEH for some reason meaning 'lord'. Hebrew also has the word REB for master, and it is used for Jewish priests today, so it is a shame to use this translation for the word.

As I understand it, the substitution of a word meaning "lord" for the divine name originated among the Israelites in order to prevent blasphemy of the divine name. In Hebrew texts, the divine name contains vowel points for the word Adonay ("lord") as a reminder not to pronounce the divine name (this, incidentally, led thirteenth century students of scripure to pronounce the name "Iehova," from which we get "Jehova"). Today, Adonay is used mainly in prayer, and orthodox Jews use the word Hashem in place of the name when not praying. Hashem is Hebrew for "the name." Hope this helps!