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Full Version: book of Hebrews: better from Greek, or Aramaic?
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When Lk 2:49 was originally written, did it have:
"busy with the things of my Father"?
"in the house of my Father"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "in the house of my Father."

Luke 2:49 - He said to them,
"Why have you been looking for Me?
Did you not know that I had to be in my Father's House?"
that I should be in the house of my Father [(‹‹ ›)] - contrary to this reading of the Aramean Peshitta, the reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: 'that I should be busy with the things of my Father'.

Diatessaron 3:33
And he said unto them,
Why were ye seeking me?
know^2 ye not that I must be in the house of my Father?
2: Or, _knew_.
The NT was originally in Aramaic, and then got translated into Greek. Tatian made his Diatessaron by synthesizing the 4 Aramaic gospels. In the translation from Aramaic into Greek, some information was lost. After the translation into Greek, probably some edits were made to the Greek, contributing to the number of textual variants. The Greek recopying tradition was inferior to the Aramaic recopying tradition, thereby giving rise to even more textual variants in Greek manuscripts as the centuries passed.

That the Aramaic even existed was basically unknown in the West until only a few hundred years ago.
I bet many scholars are unaware of the arguments for Aramaic being the original, e.g., arguments examining mistranslations in the Greek mss. that are resolved by looking at the Aramaic.
Some scholars have built their careers on study of the Greek, and don't want that upset by the original being demonstrated to be not Greek but Aramaic.

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When Lk 1:11 was originally written, did it have:
"to Zechariah"? "to him"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "to Zechariah."

Luke 1:11 - (Then) [the angel of the Lord] appeared to Zechariah. It was on the right side of the altar of incense.
to Zechariah - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: 'to him'.

Diatessaron 1:12
And there appeared unto Zacharias the angel of the Lord, standing at the right of the altar of incense;

When Lk 1:17 was originally written, did it have:
"the prophet Elijah"? merely "Elijah"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "the prophet Elijah."

Luke 1:17 - He will go before Him in the spirit and power of the prophet Elijah to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and those who disbelieve in the knowledge of the Righteous, to such a perfect people to prepare for the Lord. "
the prophet - this designation is missing in the Greek NA28, MHT and TR, but it is part of the reading of the Aramean Peshitta.

Diatessaron 1:18
And he shall go before him in the spirit, and in the power of Elijah the prophet, to turn back the heart of the fathers to the sons, and those that obey not to the knowledge of the righteous; and to prepare for the Lord a perfect people.

When Lk 3:4 was originally written, did it have:
"in the plain make a straight path for our God"?
"make his paths straight"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "in the plain make a straight path for our God."

Luke 3:4 - as it is written in the book of the words of the prophet Isaiah, who said, “The voice of one crying in the wilderness, 
Prepare the way of the Lord, 
make a straight path in the plain for our GOD.
       in the plain make a straight path for our GOD - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: "make his paths straight."

Diatessaron 3:43
This is he that was spoken of in Isaiah the prophet, 
The voice which crieth in the desert, 
Prepare ye the way of the Lord, 
And make straight in the plain, paths for our God.
How would you render Lk 3:5?
Does "crooked" and "straightened" belong in it?

Diatessaron 3:44
All the valleys shall become filled,
And all the mountains and hills shall become low;
And the rough shall become plain,
And the difficult place, easy;

Luke 3:5
All valleys will be filled
and all mountains and hills will be leveled,
rugged places will be smoothed (ironed)
and difficult terrain (will turn into) a plain.
explanation - the text follows the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads:

"Every valley will be filled
and every mountain and hill will be made flat,
and what is crooked will be straightened
and what is uneven will be made flat."
Does Luke 3:15 open with:
"the people are expecting/ in expectation"?
"the people began to put their hope in John"?
"the people were thinking of John"?

Luke 3:15 - As the people began to put their hope in John
and they (all) considered in their hearts whether he was possibly the Christ,
As the people began to put their hopes on John - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta that seems to us much clearer than the Greek of the NA28, MHT and TR, which reads: "When the people were waiting".

Luke 3:15
(Berean Literal) And the people are expecting
and all wondering in their hearts concerning John, whether he might be the Christ.
(Young's Literal) And the people are looking forward,
and all are reasoning in their hearts concerning John, whether or not he may be the Christ;
(KJV) And as the people were in expectation,
and all men mused in their hearts of John, whether he were the Christ, or not;

(Aramaic Bible in Plain English) But as the people had been thinking about Yohannan
and they were all pondering in their hearts whether he were The Messiah,
(Etheridge) But while the people thought concerning Juchanon,
and all of them reasoned in their hearts whether he were the Meshicha,
(Murdock) And while the people were thinking of John,
and all pondered in their heart, whether he were the Messiah;
(Lamsa) While the people were placing their hope on John,
and all of them were thinking in their hearts, that perhaps he is the Christ;

Diatessaron 4:24
And when the people were conjecturing about John,
and all of them thinking in their hearts whether he were haply the Messiah,
When Lk 3:18 was originally written, did it have:
exhorting and preaching?
teaching and preaching?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have teaching and preaching.

Luke 3:18 - He also taught many other things and proclaimed the Good News to the people.
He also taught many other things - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: "He also gave many incentives."

Luke 3:18
(Etheridge) But many other things he also taught and preached to the people.
(Murdock) And many other things also, he taught and proclaimed to the people.
(Aramaic Bible in Plain English) Also he taught many other things, and he preached The Good News to the people.

Diatessaron 4:27
And other things he taught and preached among the people.

Luke 3:18
(Berean Literal) Therefore indeed exhorting many other things, he was preaching the good news to the people.
(HCSB) Then, along with many other exhortations, he proclaimed good news to the people.
(KJV) And many other things in his exhortation preached he unto the people.
(Young's Literal) And, therefore, indeed with many other things, exhorting, he was proclaiming good news to the people,

Luke 3:18
https://biblehub.com/interlinear/luke/3-18.htm
3870/ parakalōn/ παρακαλῶν/ exhorting
2097/ euēngelizeto/ εὐηγγελίζετο/ he was preaching the good news to

3870. parakaleó
https://biblehub.com/greek/3870.htm
Original Word: παρακαλέω
Part of Speech: Verb
Transliteration: parakaleó
Phonetic Spelling: (par-ak-al-eh'-o)
Definition: to call to or for, to exhort, to encourage
Usage: (a) I send for, summon, invite, (b) I beseech, entreat, beg, © I exhort, admonish, (d) I comfort, encourage, console.
HELPS Word-studies
3870 parakaléō (from 3844 /pará, "from close-beside" and 2564 /kaléō, "to call") – properly, "make a call" from being "close-up and personal." 3870 /parakaléō ("personally make a call") refers to believers offering up evidence that stands up in God's court.
[3870 (parakaléō), the root of 3875 /paráklētos ("legal advocate"), likewise has legal overtones.]
When Lk 4:23 was originally written, did it have:
"perhaps/ haply"?
"undoubtedly/ certainly"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "perhaps/ haply."

Luke 4:23 - Jesus said to them, “Perhaps you would like to say this proverb to Me: 'Doctor, heal Yourself, for we have heard all that You have done in Capernaum. Do that (also) here in your (own) city.'”
perhaps - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The Greek NA28, MHT and TR read: 'undoubtedly' or: 'certainly'.

Diatessaron 17:42
And Jesus knew their opinion, and said unto them, Will ye haply^2 say unto me this proverb, Physician, heal first thyself: and all that we have heard that thou didst in Capernaum, do here also in thine own city?
2: _cf_. ... 4:24, note.
Note to 4:24: Our translator constantly uses this Arabic word (which we render _haply_, or, _can it be?_ or _perhaps_ etc.) to represent the Syriac word used in this place. The latter is used in various ways, and need not be interrogative, as our translator renders it....
When Lk 4:34 was originally written, did it have:
"Leave me (alone)"?
merely "ah"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "Leave me (alone)."

Luke 4:34 - and said, "Leave me (alone)! What do we have to do with You, Jesus, the Nazarene? Have you come to destroy us? I know who You are, You are the Holy One of GOD! ”
       Leave me - or, "Leave me." This is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. In the reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR we only find a short exclamation here.
       What do we have to do with you? - literally: 'what about us and what about you ...' (‹Aramean Peshitta and Greek NA28, MHT and TR›)

Diatessaron 6:42
And there was in the synagogue a man with an unclean devil, and he cried out with a loud voice, and said, Let me alone; what have I to do with thee, thou Jesus of Nazareth? art thou come for our destruction? I know thee who thou art, thou Holy One of God.

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When Lk 5:10 was originally written, did it have:
"catch people to life"?
merely "catch people"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "catch people to life."

Luke 5:10 - Also James and John, the sons of Zebedee, who worked with Simeon. (But) Jesus said to Simeon, "Do not be afraid, from now on you will catch people to save (them)."
to ... save - this text is part of the Aramaic Peshitta, but is missing from the reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR.

Diatessaron 6:3
And Jesus said unto Simon, Fear not; henceforth thou shalt be a fisher of men unto life.

Luke 5:10
(Etheridge) Even so also Jacub and Juchanon, sons of Zabdai, who were partners of Shemun. But Jeshu said, Fear not, from henceforth the sons of men shalt thou catch unto life.
(KJV) And so was also James, and John, the sons of Zebedee, which were partners with Simon. And Jesus said unto Simon, Fear not; from henceforth thou shalt catch men.

When Lk 5:19 was originally written, did it have:
"from the roof"?
"through the roof tiles"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "from the roof."

Luke 5:19 - When they couldn't find a solution to bring him in because of the crowd (people), they climbed up on the roof and lowered him from the roof with the cot in the middle, (exactly) in front of Jesus.
no solution - literally: 'no way'.
from the roofing - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: 'between the roof tiles'.

Diatessaron 7:15
And some men brought a bed with a man on it who was paralytic. And they sought to bring him in and lay him before him. And when they found no way to bring him in because of the multitude of people, they went up to the roof, and let him down with his bed from the roofing, into the midst before Jesus.

Luke 5:19
(Etheridge) And when they found not how to bring him in because of the multitude of people, they ascended to the house-top, and sent him with his couch from the roof into the midst before Jeshu.
(KJV) And when they could not find by what way they might bring him in because of the multitude, they went upon the housetop, and let him down through the tiling with his couch into the midst before Jesus.
For Luke 19:9, do you think Jesus originally literally said:
"salvation has come"?  "life has come"?
(if "life has come":  do you consider "salvation has come" a theological/doctrinal embellishment?)

Luke 19:9 
https://biblehub.com/luke/19-9.htm
http://dukhrana.com 
(Berean Literal) And Jesus said to him, "Today salvation has come to this house, because he also is a son of Abraham.
(Young's Literal) And Jesus said unto him -- 'To-day salvation did come to this house, inasmuch as he also is a son of Abraham;
(KJV) And Jesus said unto him, This day is salvation come to this house, forsomuch as he also is a son of Abraham.

(Aramaic Bible in Plain English) Yeshua said to him, “Today, The Life has come to this house, because This One also is The Son of Abraham.”
(Murdock) Jesus said to him: This day, life is to this house; for he also is a son of Abraham.

When Luke 5:20 was originally written, did it say:
"the paralytic"?
merely "him"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "the paralytic."

Luke 5:20 - When Jesus saw their faith, He said to the paralytic, "Man, your sins are forgiven!"
the paralytic - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. In the reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR it says: 'him'.

Diatessaron 7:16
And when Jesus saw their faith, he said unto the paralytic, My son, thy sins are forgiven thee.
Do you think Mt 27:9 originally said "Jeremiah"?
(if 'no': do you consider "Jeremiah" an embellishment in Greek mss.?)

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron lack the erroneous "Jeremiah."

Matthew 27:9
https://biblehub.com/matthew/27-9.htm
(Berean Literal) Then was fulfilled that having been spoken by the prophet Jeremiah, saying, "And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of the One having been priced, whom they set a price on by the sons of Israel,
(Young's Literal) Then was fulfilled that spoken through Jeremiah the prophet, saying, 'And I took the thirty silverlings, the price of him who hath been priced, whom they of the sons of Israel did price,
(Aramaic Bible in Plain English) Then was fulfilled what was spoken by the Prophet who said, “I took thirty silver coins, the price of The Precious One on which they of the children of Israel had agreed.

Diatessaron 51:13
Therein was fulfilled the saying in the prophet which said, I took thirty pieces of money, the price of the precious one, which was fixed by the children of Israel; and I paid them for the plain of the potter, as the Lord commanded me.
Do you think Luke 5:27 originally said:
"Jesus went out"?
"He went out"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "Jesus went out."

Luke 5:27 - After these things, Jesus went out and saw a tax collector named Levi sitting in the toll house. He said to him, "Follow Me!"
Jesus - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: 'He'.

Diatessaron 7:25
And after that, Jesus went out, and saw a publican, named Levi, sitting among the publicans: and he said unto him, Follow me.

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Do you think Luke 5:30 originally had a "their"?

Neither the Peshitta nor the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have a "their."

Luke 5:30 - (But) the scribes and Pharisees grumbled and said to his disciples, "Why do you eat and drink with publicans and sinners?"
the scribes and Pharisees - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek MHT and TR reads "their scribes and the Pharisees," while the reading of the Greek NA28 reads "the Pharisees and their scribes."

Diatessaron 7:28
And the scribes and Pharisees murmured, and said unto his disciples, Why do ye eat and drink with the publicans and sinners?
Do you think "deuteroproto" represents something originally in Luke 6:1?
Do you know what it means? 

Luke 6:1 - On the Sabbath, Jesus walked through the corn, while his disciples plucked ears and rubbed them with their hands and ate them.
       On the Sabbath, Jesus walked - literally, "It happened on the Sabbath that Jesus ... walked." In the Greek MHT and TR we find the lecture: "On the Sabbath the second-first it happened that Jesus ...". In the Greek NA28 the words 'the second-first' are missing. The Greek word 'deuteroproto' is not to be found in any other Greek writing and seems to be an artificial term. Others believe or argue (ia Benson Commentary ›) that it was a Jewish-Greek term for the Sabbaths of the Feast of Unleavened Bread after the Sabbath day that immediately followed the slaughter of the Voorbijbijoffer or Passover. In the Aramaic Peshitta it simply says: 'On the Sabbath'.

(Lk 6:1 didn't make it into the Diatessaron.)

Lk PDF at http://www.willker.de/wie/TCG/
TVU 75
29. Difficult variant
NA28 Luke 6:1 ....
BYZ Luke 6:1 ....
T&T #8
Byz A, C, D, R, X, D, Q, Y, f13, 892, Maj, Lat(a, aur, d, f, ff2, vg), Sy-H, goth, Gre
Lat = sabbato secundoprimo

txt P4(200 CE), P75vid, 01, B, L, W, f1, 69, 788(=f13), 22, 33, 157, 579, 1241, 2542, pc8, it(b, c, e, l, q, r1), Sy-P, Sy-Hmg, Sy-Pal, Co
pc = 588, 697, 791, 1005, 1210, 1365, 2372, 2670
....
A real mystery. The word occurs nowhere else (M.A. Robinson notes the titles of
several psalms, which also contain similar references of (today) unknown
meaning). The reading is normally considered as originating through some
strange scribal blunder. But the given explanations are quite unsatisfactory. The
best is that of Skeat who thinks of a dittography ...., which was
subsequently interpreted as .... Another explanation is that.... 
It remains strange. If the word is correct, it must have been borrowed from
something in the Jewish calendar, and should have been generally known. Then
there would be no reason for an omission. 
It might additionally be noted that .... is visually and acoustically
similar to the following word ....

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Do you think Luke 6:4 originally had "on the table of the Lord"?

Luke 6:4 - How he entered the house of GOD and took the (show) bread on the table of the Lord, which no one should eat except the priests, and eaten (it) also to those who were with him goods?"
       on the table of the Lord - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The words are completely missing in the reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR.

(Lk 6:4 didn't make it into the Diatessaron.)

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Do you think Luke 6:12 originally had "Jesus"? 

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "Jesus."

Luke 6:12 - In those days Jesus went out to a mountain to pray. He stayed there all night praying to GOD.
       In those days ... - in full: "And it happened in those days ..."
       Jesus - the name is part of the text of the Aramaic Peshitta, but is missing from the reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR.

Diatessaron 8:9 
And in those days Jesus went out to the mountain that he might pray, and he spent the night there in prayer to God. 

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Do you think Luke 7:13 originally said:  "Jesus"?  "Lord"?
(if 'Jesus':  do you think 'Lord' was a theological embellishment in Greek mss.?)

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "Jesus."

Luke 7:13 - Jesus saw her and took pity on her and said to her, "Don't cry!"
       Jesus - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: 'Lord' (‹Kurios›).
       Don't cry - it probably means "Stop crying," because it is likely that the woman was already crying.

Diatessaron 11:19
And when Jesus saw her, he had compassion on her, and said unto her, Weep not. 

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Do you think Luke 7:19 originally said: 
"with him"?
"Jesus"?
(if you think it originally had 'Jesus,' do you think 'Lord' was a theological embellishment in some Greek mss.?)

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "Jesus," while neither have "with him."

Luke 7:19 - (Then) John called two of his disciples (with him) and sent them to Jesus and (made them) say, "Is it it that is to come, or should we expect another?"
       with them - we find these words only in the Greek NA28, MHT and TR.
       Jesus - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta, the MHT and TR. The reading of the Greek NA28 reads: 'the Lord' (‹Kurios›).

Diatessaron 13:39
And when John heard in the prison of the doings of the Messiah, he called two of his disciples, and sent them to Jesus, and said, Art thou he that cometh, or look we for another?
How should Luke 7:30 be rendered in English?
Do you Luke 7:30 originally had: "scribes"? "lawyers"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "scribes."

Luke 7:30 - But the Pharisees and the scribes rejected the counsel of GOD within them because they were not baptized by him.
scribes - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: 'lawyers'.
in their interior - in the Aramean Peshitta it literally says: 'in their soul'. The translations of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR give a confusing picture because of the various translations such as: 'towards oneself', 'regarding oneself' or 'for oneself' etc.

Diatessaron 14:3
But the Pharisees and the scribes wronged the purpose of God in themselves, in that they were not baptized of him.

========
How should Luke 7:39 be rendered in English?
Did Luke 7:39 originally have:
"deliberated and said"?
or merely "said"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "deliberated and said."

Luke 7:39 - When the Pharisee who invited Him saw that, he deliberated and said, “If this was (really) a prophet, He would know who she is and how she is known, because the woman who touched him is a sinner."
he asked himself and said - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: 'he said to himself'.
would He ... be a sinner - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: "Would He know who and what kind of woman it is that touches Him, because she is a sinner?"

Diatessaron 14:48
And when that Pharisee saw it, who invited him, he thought within himself, and said, This man, if he were a prophet, would know who she is and what is her history: for the woman which touched him was a sinner.

============
Do you think Luke 7:41 originally had "to him"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "to him."

Luke 7:41 - Jesus said to him, “A creditor had two debtors. One owed him five hundred dinars and the other fifty dinars.
to him - these words are part of the text of the Aramaic Peshitta, but they are missing from the text of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR.

Diatessaron 15:2
Jesus said unto him, There were two debtors to one creditor; and one of them owed five hundred pence, and the other owed fifty pence.
Do you think Luke 7:44 originally had "head"?

Neither the Peshitta nor the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "head."

Luke 7:44 - (Then) He turned to the woman and said to Simeon, “Do you see this woman? I have entered your house, but you have not given me water for my feet, but she has washed my feet with her tears and dried them with the hair of her (head).
main - the word is missing in the text of the Aramaic Peshitta, but not in the text of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR.

Diatessaron 15:5
And he turned to that woman, and said to Simon, Dost thou see this woman? I entered into thy dwelling, and thou gavest me not water to wash my feet: but this woman hath bathed my feet with her tears, and dried them with her hair.

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Do you think Luke 7:48 originally had "woman"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "woman."

Luke 7:48 - (Then) He said to her, "Woman, your sins are forgiven."
Woman - this word is part of the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The word does not appear in the reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR.

Diatessaron 15:9
And he said unto that woman, Thy sins are forgiven thee.

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Do you think Luke 8:5 originally had "of heaven"?

Neither the Peshitta nor the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "of heaven."

Luke 8:5 - “A sower went out to sow his seed. As he sowed, (a part) fell by the side of the road and it was trampled and a bird ate (it).
and a bird ate [(‹het›)] - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: "and the birds of heaven ate it."

Diatessaron 16:25
The sower went forth to sow: and when he sowed, some fell on the beaten highway; and it was trodden upon, and the birds ate it.

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Do you think Luke 8:34 originally had: "villages"? "fields/land"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "villages."

Luke 8:34 - When the shepherds saw what had happened, they fled and told it in the city and in the villages.
in the villages - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: 'on the fields', or: 'on the land'.

Diatessaron 11:50
And when the keepers saw what happened, they fled, and told those in the cities and villages.

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Do you think Luke 8:41 originally had "and he was"?

Neither the Peshitta nor the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "and he was."

Luke 8:41 - And, behold, a man named Jairus, ruler of the synagogue, fell down at the feet of Jesus, and besought him to come home to him,
And see .... synagogue - for the word 'superior' in this reading of the Aramean Peshitta it literally says: 'head'. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: "And behold, a man named Jairus came, and he was ruler of the synagogue."

Diatessaron 12:7
And a man named Jairus, the chief of the synagogue, fell before the feet of Jesus, and besought him much, and said unto him, I have an only daughter, and she is come nigh unto death; but come and lay thy hand upon her, and she shall live.
Do you think Luke 8:46 originally had: "Jesus said"? "He said"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "He said."

Luke 8:46 - (But) Jesus said, "Someone touched Me, for I have noticed that power has gone out from Me."
Jesus said - this is the reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR. The reading of the Aramean Peshitta reads: 'He said'.

Diatessaron 12:18
And he said, Some one approached unto me; and I knew that power went forth from me.

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Do you think Luke 8:48 originally had:
"has given you Life"?
"has saved you"?
(if 'has given you Life': do you think 'has saved you' is a theological embellishment in Greek mss.?)

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "has given you Life."

Luke 8:48 - He said to her, “Take heart, my daughter, your faith has given you Life. Go in peace! "
has given you life - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: "Your faith has saved you."

Diatessaron 12:21
And Jesus said unto her, Be of good courage, daughter; thy faith hath made thee alive; depart in peace, and be whole from thy plague.

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Do you think Luke 8:50 originally had:
"and said to the girl's father"?
"and answered him"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "and said to the girl's father."

Luke 8:50 - But Jesus heard and said to the girl's father, "Fear not, only believe, and she will live!"
said to the girl's father - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads simply: "and answered him".

Diatessaron 12:23
But Jesus heard, and said unto the father of the maid, Fear not: but believe only, and she shall live.

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Do you think Luke 9:14 originally had:
"Jesus said to them"?
"He said to his disciples"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "Jesus said to them."

Luke 9:14 - Because there were about five thousand men. (But) Jesus said to them, "Sit them down in groups of fifty!"
Jesus said to them - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshi:tta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: "He said to his disciples."

Diatessaron 18:36
Jesus said unto them, Arrange all the people that they may sit down on the grass, fifty people in a company.

There isn't a discussion of any Luke 7:48 variants in the Luke PDF at
http://www.willker.de/wie/TCG/
The closest is below.
How would you render Luke 7:47?

TVU 117
Minority reading:
NA28 Luke 7:47 ....
D: ....
d: ....
e: ....
Propter quod dico tibi: Remittentur illi peccata
cui autem pusillum dimittuntur, diligit modicum.
Ephrem: 45 You did not kiss me, but she has not ceased kissing my feet from the
moment she entered. 47 Wherefore her many sins are sorgive her.
The one who is sorgive little loves little.
POxy 4009: ....
B: no umlaut
Compare next verse 48:
NA28 Luke 7:48 ....
The verse is problematic:
"Therefore I tell you, forgiven are her sins, which were many, because she did
love much. But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little."
These words do not really fit to the preceding parable. In the parable love is the
_result_ of the forgiveness. By contrast in verse 47 the woman is forgiven _because_
she did love much.
The omission of .... is probably an attempt to overcome this problem.
Ephrem, in his commentary, is abbreviating the verses, e.g. is he omitting verse
46, also. Thus it is uncertain, what he read in his Diatessaron. At least he is not
citing "because she did love much". The Arabic reads the full form.

Diatessaron 15:9 (Aramaic to Arabic to English)
And for this, I say unto thee, Her many sins are forgiven her, because she loved much; for he to whom little is forgiven loveth little.

Luke 7:47 (Aramaic to Dutch to English)
Therefore I say to you, Her many sins are forgiven her, for she loved much. But whoever is forgiven little, loves little. "

Luke 7:47 (based on Younan: Aramaic to English)
For I say this to you:
because her sins that are forgiven her are many,
she has loved much.
But he that is forgiven little,
him loves little."
Do you think Luke 9:50 originally had: "you... you"? "us... us"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "you... you."

Luke 9:50 - Jesus said to him, "Do not forbid him, for whoever is not against you is for you."
you - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta and the Greek NA28. The Greek MHT and TR read: "us". This applies to both times the word occurs in this verse.

Diatessaron 25:16
Every one who is not in opposition to you is with you.

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Do you think Luke 9:56 originally had:
"For the Son of Man has not come to destroy lives, but to give Life"?
"For the Son of Man has not come to destroy lives, but to save"?
none of that?

(if you think it had that clause with 'give life': was the 'save' a theological embellishment in some Greek mss.?)

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "For the Son of Man has not come to destroy lives, but to give Life."

Luke 9:56 - For the Son of Man has not come to destroy lives, but to give Life! ” And they went (further) to other villages.
Because ... give! - the Greek NA28 and several Greek manuscripts omit this phrase entirely, but it does appear in the reading of the Greek MHT and TR and that of the Aramaic Peshitta.
to give Life - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: 'to save'.

Diatessaron 38:47
Verily the Son of man did not come to destroy lives, but to give life.

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Do you think Luke 10:1 originally had: "Jesus"? "the Lord"?
(if 'Jesus,' was 'the Lord' a theological embellishment in Greek mss.?)

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "Jesus."

Luke 10:1 - After this, Jesus appointed seventy others out of his disciples and sent them two by two to all the regions and cities where he would go.
Jesus - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: 'the Lord'.
two by two - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta and the Greek NA28. The reading of the Greek MHT and TR reads: 'two pairs' or: 'with two' (‹literally: 'each two'›).

Diatessaron 15:15
And after that, Jesus set apart from his disciples other seventy, and sent them two and two before his face to every region and city whither he was purposing to go.

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Do you think Luke 10:11 originally had:
"at our feet"? "that sticks to us"?
"close to you"? "close by"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "at our feet" and "close to you."

Luke 10:11 - “We shake off even the dust of your city that sticks to our feet. But know this, that the Kingdom of GOD has come close to you.
at our feet - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta and of the Greek NA28, but of the Greek MHT and TR the reading is: 'that sticks to us'.
close to you - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta and of the Greek MHT and TR. The reading of the Greek NA28 reads 'close by'.

Diatessaron 15:25
But whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you not, go out into the market, and say, Even the dust that clave to our feet from your city, we shake off against you; but know this, that the kingdom of God is come near unto you.

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Do you think Luke 10:29 originally had: "Him"? "Jesus"?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "Him."

Luke 10:29 - But he wanted to justify himself and said to Him, "Who is my neighbor?"
Him - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: 'Jesus'.

Diatessaron 34:35
And he, as his desire was to justify himself, said unto him, And who is my neighbour?

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Do you think Luke 11:1 originally had: "our Lord"? merely "Lord"?
The Peshitta has "our Lord" 299 times, while the Greek NT has "our Lord" merely 68 times. To what do you ascribe that stark difference?

Both the Peshitta and the by-A.D. 175 Diatessaron have "our Lord."

Luke 11:1 - While He was praying in a certain place and was done with it, one of His disciples said to Him, "Our Lord, teach us to pray, just as John also taught (that) his disciples."
Our Lord - this is the reading of the Aramean Peshitta. The reading of the Greek NA28, MHT and TR reads: 'Lord'. Only in 68 of the 299 times that the expression "Our Lord" occurs in the Peshitta, we also find the expression "our Lord" in the Greek NT.

Diatessaron 9:31
One of his disciples said unto him, Our Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.
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