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Full Version: Complete Old Testament Interlinear published!
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I am very pleased to announce the publication of the complete Aramaic English Interlinear Peshitta Old Testament. It is available through Lulu Publishing as a downloadable pdf ebook:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/rev-david-bausc...62636.html

This is a literal word for word interlinear translation of the 1900+ year old Aramaic Old Testament called the Peshitta. This volume contains the entire OT- the 39 books of the Hebrew Bible and the Protestant Old Testament canon. Aramaic was the native language of Jesus and of Israel in the 1st century AD. The text translated is the 6th-7th century Codex Ambrosianus- the oldest complete Semitic Old Testament. The Peshitta Old Testament was very likely translated from the Hebrew Bible in the 1st century AD in Israel by Christian coverts from Judaism, or possibly Syrian Christians from across Israel's border. Either way, the Peshitta Old and New Testaments together constitute the first Christian Bible. The author has translated and published an interlinear of the entire Aramaic Peshitta New Testament and plain English translations of the NT, the Torah, the Psalms & Proverbs. PDF EBook 8x11" format 1956 pages in color.
This is great news! Thank you.
Really cool, Dave! I just started reading this today. I've always read the Hebrew Masoretic at home, so this Aramaic Old Testament is new to me.

Right out of the gates, I think its very profound that that the Aramaic of Genesis 1:1 has ܐܠܗܐ , but the Masoretic has אלהימ .

It is also very satisfying to see so much gospel harmony with ܡܪܝܐ , as for example in Deuteronomy 32:9. I feel like this Aramaic Old Testament is going to answer a lot of questions for me, such as why the Messiah did not say יהוה . In the original Old Testament that was lost to time, I wonder how many instances of ܡܪܝܐ were originally יהוה ? And what is the greater meaning of all this textual development?
Congrats on such a monumental achievement.

May I ask if there are any plans for getting this work on platforms like BibleWorks? That would be a dream come true! Let us know if we can help in anyway to make it happen or donate to a Kickstart project for this.
(11-05-2017, 07:22 PM)gregglaser Wrote: [ -> ]I think its very profound that that the Aramaic of Genesis 1:1 has  ܐܠܗܐ , but the Masoretic has אלהימ .  

It is also very satisfying to see so much gospel harmony with ܡܪܝܐ , as for example in Deuteronomy 32:9.  I feel like this Aramaic Old Testament is going to answer a lot of questions for me, such as why the Messiah did not say יהוה .   In the original Old Testament that was lost to time, I wonder how many instances of ܡܪܝܐ  were originally  יהוה ?  And what is the greater meaning of all this textual development?

"Alaha" is the Aramaic equivalent of the Hebrew "Elohim". Aramaic dialects do not use the plural form as we find it in Hebrew. This is also true of biblical Aramaic.

All instances of "Maryah" in the Peshitta refer to the Tetragrammaton, both OT ant NT. "Maryah" is first person singular masculine emphatic exactly like "Adonai". Just like "Adonai", it serves as a term equivalent to YHWH (Yahueh), and both mean "supreme Lord" or "Lord most high".

The Jews never used the Name in any other language than Hebrew. Even in the Hebrew Bible, the Aramaic portions never contain the Tetragrammaton (e.g. Daniel). I assume this is due to concerns about different pronunciation of dialects, or just because of the Name's special holiness. Even in some of the most ancient Hebrew manuscripts, they wrote the entire text in Ashuri, but the Tetragrammaton in Paleo Hebrew, which again might be to remind of the most ancient pronunciation [as language changes, so does pronunciation and the associated script].

There are about 130 instances in the Peshitta where it reads "Maryah", but the Hebrew reads "Adonai" (e.g. Ps. 110:4, Is. 6:1, 7:14). These are part of the 134 passages where "Adonai" appears without the Tetragrammaton in the Tanakh (just "Adonai", not "Adonai YHWH" etc). All or almost all of these passages were changes from YHWH to Adonai over time in the Hebrew, and for almost all of them we have proof.

Ginsburg spoke about this in his Mesorah where he argues all of the 134 passages which say "Adonai" in the MT, but have some textual evidence for YHWH, originally said YHWH rather than Adonai (Massorah, §§ 107-115, Ginsburg's edition*).

The reasons for the changes are many. Mostly the passages are those where someone invokes the name in a negative fashion, e.g. "Adonai/YHWH has forsaken us". But some are central to theology, like the coronation Psalm #110, which shows the LORD rules through the King's right hand.

*see https://archive.org/stream/MassorahMasso...9/mode/2up