Peshitta Forum

Full Version: Secariota
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
In my search for the etymology of this term, I came upon this page:
<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.zefaniabible.com/en/demo/reading-overview/zefaniabible/commentary/47/10/4.html">http://www.zefaniabible.com/en/demo/rea ... /10/4.html</a><!-- m -->
Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Wrote:Others think he is so called, from the Syriac word, 'Xwyrks, "secariota", which signifies a "purse", or bag, because he carried the bag.
I was unable to find such a lexical definition. Has anyone heard of this?
Shlama akhi,

I've not heard of the term personally, but I do recall S'CAR from Hebrew means "payment / price" - so perhaps that is where the idea came from.
Burning one Wrote:Shlama akhi,

I've not heard of the term personally, but I do recall S'CAR from Hebrew means "payment / price" - so perhaps that is where the idea came from.

Shlama Akhi Burning One:
I once pondered that s'cariota is from Isacchar (Judas Iscariot), one of the oringinal tribes of Israel. It's a leap of faith here.

Shlama,
Stephen Silver
Interesting! I have heard of a different ascription to the term "Qeriot" to a place in southern Yahudah known as the cities (hence the plural form) of Kerioth-Hezron sometimes called "Hazor" like Joshua 15:25 says. (International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, fully revised edition, under the K section. It could be that Iscariot didnt translate well into Greek, and it was an Aramaic term for the same place. This makes sense to me, since the Brit Chadasha frequently mentions places that are uncommon, like Simon of Cyrene, Mary of Magdala, so why not Yehudah of Qeriyot? After all, there was more than one disciple named Yehudah (see John 14:22) and whatever Qeriot is, it was the way he was distinguished from others with a common name.

It could be where he's from or it could be that he carried the purse, but no one really knows.
Thanks for the thoughts.
The main issue here is the term uses teth instead of taw, whereas these explanations all point to a taw.
Could there be any explanation of this?
I see the nun-teth-lamed root means to take up and the nun-teth-he root means to spread out, the latter of which may be more so derived to resemble the term (though its meaning is a bit at odds with it).