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Full Version: Luke 24:32 (were not our hearts heavy?)
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In Luke 24:32 we find an expression which in Greek and Murdock and Etheridge translate to 'burnt not our Hearts inside when ...'
( Did not our heart burn within us, while he talked with us by the way, )

However, the Aramaic means something else, it does not mean 'burn' but heavy or precious.
G.D. Bauscher translates this to 'dull'.

What I understand is that they meant that they were 'slow of understanding', they even did not recognize him until he broke the bread.

So: What does a 'heavy heart' in fact mean? Is it some Aramaic idom?
distazo Wrote:In Luke 24:32 we find an expression which in Greek and Murdock and Etheridge translate to 'burnt not our Hearts inside when ...'
( Did not our heart burn within us, while he talked with us by the way, )

However, the Aramaic means something else, it does not mean 'burn' but heavy or precious.
G.D. Bauscher translates this to 'dull'.

What I understand is that they meant that they were 'slow of understanding', they even did not recognize him until he broke the bread.

So: What does a 'heavy heart' in fact mean? Is it some Aramaic idom?

Shlama Akhi:
It appears that both John Wesley Etheridge and James Murdock mistook "yakir" (heavy, honour) for "yakad" (burning). This also seems to be the same scribal error that led to the Greek "kaiomenei", "burn". To my understanding the Aramaic and Hebrew apply the equivalence of "burden=honour". The disciples were burdened and honoured to hear all that Yeshua shared with them on the way. (Luke 24:32)

Shlama,
Stephen Silver
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George Lamsa's translation is:

Luke 24:32 And they said one to another, Were not our hearts heavy within us, when he spoke with us on the road, and interpreted the scriptures to us?
thank you for your answer.

But my problem is that I don't understand the phrase 'heavey heart inside us'. Must this be understood as 'honoured?'
shlomo,

It could mean that they were deep in thoughts and emotions with what He was explaining to them and the whole encounter.

In the Semitic world, the Heart is considered the centre of human intelligence rather than the Mind as in the Greek world.

push bashlomo,
keefa-morun
Dear Abudar,

Right. So this means that '...burnt our hearts inside...' is the right translation <!-- sSmile --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/smile.gif" alt="Smile" title="Smile" /><!-- sSmile -->

The translation 'dull/heavy' do not really make sense. As if they were depressed or stubborn while Jeshua was speaking with them.
distazo Wrote:Dear Abudar,

Right. So this means that '...burnt our hearts inside...' is the right translation <!-- sSmile --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/smile.gif" alt="Smile" title="Smile" /><!-- sSmile -->

The translation 'dull/heavy' do not really make sense. As if they were depressed or stubborn while Jeshua was speaking with them.

Shlama Akhi:
Please forgive me for wading in here.

[font=Estrangelo (V1.1)]Jwgb 0wh ryqy Nbl 0wh f[/font]

It is just not correct to translate the phrase in Luke 24:32 as "did not our hearts burn within us", when rather it reads, "were not our hearts heavy/precious within us". Clearly, it is a RESH and not a DALET at the end of yakir.

See also the root [font=Estrangelo (V1.1)]rqy[/font] in Matthew 15:4, Mark 10:19, Luke 18:20, Ephesians 6:2, I Timothy 5:3. In all of these instances yakar means honour.

Granted the form is slightly different but as you can see the root yakar can mean heavy, precious or honour. Payne Smith elaborates on its meaning on page 196.

Rather than trying to stretch the meaning of yakir to mean "burn", which it doesn't, just accept that the word in the text is yakir and its extended meaning shows that the disciples were naturally burdened with grief, and at the same time were honoured by the illumination of the scriptures which Yeshua shared with them on the way.

Shlama,
Stephen Silver
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shlomo Distazo,

distazo Wrote:Right. So this means that '...burnt our hearts inside...' is the right translation <!-- sSmile --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/smile.gif" alt="Smile" title="Smile" /><!-- sSmile -->

The translation 'dull/heavy' do not really make sense. As if they were depressed or stubborn while Jeshua was speaking with them.

The word "heavy" here is the proper translation, and translating it that way will be more accurate in keeping with the Peshitta.
My brief explanation was just to give you an idea of what it means; at best you can give its meaning in an appendix.

The words "heart", "hand", "House", "face", etc... all have special meaning when constructed with other words.

push bashlomo,
keefa-morun
Thank you all!

It is important to me to have such things right in the translation.

I think I've found the right Dutch words which imply both heavy as well as honoured.
Maybe in English as well: "Were we not deeply touched when he..?"

The footnote provides the literal text, which is Aramaic idiom.