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Shlama Akhay,

John Wesley Etheridge, in his Horae Aramaicae, quotes a subscription in the Arabic version of Matthew.....

[QUOTE] Various important Greek codices of Matthew close with the statement that he wrote his work in Hebrew; and with this the Syriac and Arabic versions are coincident. The subscription of the former is found in the proper place in the present volume; and that of the Arabic reads as follows: Here ends the copy of the Gospel of the apostle Matthew. He wrote it in the land of Palestine, by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, in the Hebrew language, EIGHT YEARS AFTER THE BODILY ASCENSION OF JESUS THE MESSIAH INTO HEAVEN, AND IN THE FIRST YEAR OF THE ROMAN EMPEROR, CLAUDIUS CAESAR."[END OF QUOTE]

This amounts to 41 A. D., doesn't it? That allows 37 years up to the point of the four Gospels dated 78 A. D. That's plenty of "elbow room." <!-- sSmile --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/smile.gif" alt="Smile" title="Smile" /><!-- sSmile -->

Shlama w'Burkate, Larry Kelsey
Wow if this statement is truth, then biblical criticism is false.

If Mark was written before Matthew, then Mark would be the real close. <!-- s:lol: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/laugh.gif" alt=":lol:" title="Laugh" /><!-- s:lol: -->
Ok, I believe that the year 41 is not a revolutionary date for Matthew. (It is the old non-bible-critism-date)

What is the origin of the quote? ie. which arabic source tells this? I ask this, because I'd like to be detailed.

thanks
distazo Wrote:Ok, I believe that the year 41 is not a revolutionary date for Matthew. (It is the old non-bible-critism-date)

What is the origin of the quote? ie. which arabic source tells this? I ask this, because I'd like to be detailed.

thanks

Shlama Akhi distazo,

My guess is that an Arab Christian shared this information or a multilingual scholar shared it with his colleagues in a book or journal and John Wesley Etheridge was fortunate enough to read / and or hear about it and to put it into the preface of his book. That's the best guess I can make.

Shlama w'Burkate, Larry Kelsey