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shlomo Jeremy,

Burning one Wrote:still, though, i am intrigued about the original reading of Ruvel/Reuven in Gilyana, since you've brought up the similarity of the Ashuri script of the lomadh and nun. do you have any thoughts about that? because if the Greek has Reuben, and the two letters in question don't appear similar in that language, and the Estrangelo/Serto/Swadaya scripts also don't have the similarity, then doesn't it point to an Ashuri script original for Gilyana and not a Greek?

I think in this case there's a simpler answer than some kind of a scribe error. I believe that most likely, the translator who spoke and wrote Aramaic, by default chose to use the Aramaic name instead of what was written in front of him.
Or this could be a case for Aramaic Primacy for the book of gelyono being written in Aramaic originally <!-- s:bomb: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/bomb.gif" alt=":bomb:" title="The Bomb" /><!-- s:bomb: --> <!-- sTongue --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/poketoungeb.gif" alt="Tongue" title="Poke Tounge" /><!-- sTongue -->
But I don't think the "lomadh"/"nun" argument applies to gelyono.

P.S. I have no opinion on the origin of gelyono, as it wasn't part of our original Peshitto canon. But if it is proven to be originally written in Aramaic, then all the better.

push bashlomo,
keefa-morun
Shlama all--

Interesting idea. I should point out that REUVEL and REUVEN have two completely different meanings. REUVEL, as Abudar rightly says, means "El is great" (rab).

REUVEN however is another matter:

Ge 29:32
Leah conceived and bore a son and named * him Reuben, for she said, "Because YHWH has seen my affliction ; surely now my husband will love me."

Technically though, it really means "Behold a son!"

So I suggest a different explanation for the spelling difference, even though it is possible Peshitta Tanakh is pre Meshikha and I think it probably is. I think however, this is a MIDRASH and REMEZ in the text where both meanings come together as: BEHOLD THE SON OF EL IS GREAT. (For YHWH has seen my affliction.)

This actually happens more often than some might think in the Peshitta text. I noted a similar hidden message with respect to the order of names in Luke.

Shlama w'burkate
Andrew Gabriel Roth
Shlama,

thank you for your help here. you have been greatly appreciated and have helped to bring some clarity to a confused individual!

btw, for future reference, should i address you as Abudar?


Chayim b'Moshiach,
Jeremy

abudar2000 Wrote:shlomo Jeremy,

Burning one Wrote:still, though, i am intrigued about the original reading of Ruvel/Reuven in Gilyana, since you've brought up the similarity of the Ashuri script of the lomadh and nun. do you have any thoughts about that? because if the Greek has Reuben, and the two letters in question don't appear similar in that language, and the Estrangelo/Serto/Swadaya scripts also don't have the similarity, then doesn't it point to an Ashuri script original for Gilyana and not a Greek?

I think in this case there's a simpler answer than some kind of a scribe error. I believe that most likely, the translator who spoke and wrote Aramaic, by default chose to use the Aramaic name instead of what was written in front of him.
Or this could be a case for Aramaic Primacy for the book of gelyono being written in Aramaic originally <!-- s:bomb: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/bomb.gif" alt=":bomb:" title="The Bomb" /><!-- s:bomb: --> <!-- sTongue --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/poketoungeb.gif" alt="Tongue" title="Poke Tounge" /><!-- sTongue -->
But I don't think the "lomadh"/"nun" argument applies to gelyono.

P.S. I have no opinion on the origin of gelyono, as it wasn't part of our original Peshitto canon. But if it is proven to be originally written in Aramaic, then all the better.

push bashlomo,
keefa-morun
Andrew Gabriel Roth Wrote:Shlama all--

Interesting idea. I should point out that REUVEL and REUVEN have two completely different meanings. REUVEL, as Abudar rightly says, means "El is great" (rab).

REUVEN however is another matter:

Ge 29:32
Leah conceived and bore a son and named * him Reuben, for she said, "Because YHWH has seen my affliction ; surely now my husband will love me."

Technically though, it really means "Behold a son!"

So I suggest a different explanation for the spelling difference, even though it is possible Peshitta Tanakh is pre Meshikha and I think it probably is. I think however, this is a MIDRASH and REMEZ in the text where both meanings come together as: BEHOLD THE SON OF EL IS GREAT. (For YHWH has seen my affliction.)

This actually happens more often than some might think in the Peshitta text. I noted a similar hidden message with respect to the order of names in Luke.

Shlama w'burkate
Andrew Gabriel Roth

Shlama, Andrew,


thanks for pointing this out. i was thinking about the difference in the two names, and was wondering why one was chosen over the other into Aramaic.

and that is a great midrashic approach to the differences!


Chayim b'Moshiach,
Jeremy
"On the acquisition of The Holy Spirit" by St. Seraphim of Sarov:

<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.fatheralexander.org/booklets/english/sermon_st_seraphim.htm">http://www.fatheralexander.org/booklets ... raphim.htm</a><!-- m -->
breekh saphro oH Andrew,

Andrew Gabriel Roth Wrote:Technically though, it really means "Behold a son!"

So I suggest a different explanation for the spelling difference, even though it is possible Peshitta Tanakh is pre Meshikha and I think it probably is. I think however, this is a MIDRASH and REMEZ in the text where both meanings come together as: BEHOLD THE SON OF EL IS GREAT. (For YHWH has seen my affliction.)

This actually happens more often than some might think in the Peshitta text. I noted a similar hidden message with respect to the order of names in Luke.

This is very interesting, almost prophetic. It must have happened when the Aramaic started taken over for the Hebrew.

I would love to see these examples.

tawdi,
keefa-morun
breekh saphro oH Jeremy,

Burning one Wrote:btw, for future reference, should i address you as Abudar?

I prefer "keefa" over "abudar".

push bashlomo,
keefa-morun
Shlama, Albion,


thank you for the link. it was certainly an engaging read. my boss and i were just speaking about some of the very things written here this past week: the giving of the Ruah to men after Messiah's ascension, as opposed to the nature of the giving before His triumphant ascension.


Chayim b'Moshiach,
Jeremy

aramaic_albion Wrote:"On the acquisition of The Holy Spirit" by St. Seraphim of Sarov:

<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.fatheralexander.org/booklets/english/sermon_st_seraphim.htm">http://www.fatheralexander.org/booklets ... raphim.htm</a><!-- m -->
noted! blessings to you until next time, Keefa!


Chayim b'Moshiach,
Jeremy

abudar2000 Wrote:breekh saphro oH Jeremy,

Burning one Wrote:btw, for future reference, should i address you as Abudar?

I prefer "keefa" over "abudar".

push bashlomo,
keefa-morun
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